Jane’s F/A-18 Simulator Revisited Page 4

Back To Page 3

 

TSHv1 in Detail

New Flyables

The TSH’s major struggle in creating cockpits for new flyable aircraft, the prime content of TSHv1, was cracking the Jane’s F/A-18 3D object file format, *.3dg. Even today, the format remains incompletely understood, and currently new user-created 3D objects for Jane’s F/A-18 do not support animation or moving parts. Nevertheless, TSHv1 features two new aircraft cockpits and 3D models: the F-14D and the A-10A. These cockpits are clickable just as the stock cockpit is. Without animation it can be difficult to tell the position of a cockpit control, but the cockpits are switchable on-the-fly and it only takes a few seconds to peek into the F/A-18E cockpit to confirm a switch or button position. TSHv1 also includes loadout screens for the F-14 and A-10 to complement the stock F/A-18E screen.

F18 F14 A10
F18arm F14arm A10arm

Flight Modeling

Unfortunately, the TSHv1 F-14 and A-10 fly just like the F/A-18E does, and they retain the same avionics as well. Avionics issues are mostly taken care of by the reconfiguration of cockpit displays and some self-discipline (i.e. don’t use the air-to-ground radar if you are flying the A-10), but the flight model issue is trickier. The method of “altering” the flight model for A-10 flying involves manipulating in-game joystick sensitivity sliders so that responses are drastically reduced from what they would be when flying the F/A-18E or F-14D; specific settings can be found in the readme included in the TSHv1 download.

This is a good time to mention the flight modeling of the F/A-18E as well, since it was a point of contention at release. The phrase “flies like a bus” was thrown around the forums, and the general feeling was that of a sluggish airplane with not enough pitch authority. Much weight was added to this opinion when “Chunx”, an instructor RIO in the F-14 and a test pilot WSO in the F/A-18E, made the statement that “The flight model is very, very wrong. If the real jet flew like that, [the Navy] would have never bought it”.

However, “Hornit” countered these statements by demonstrating that he could fight the Jane’s F/A-18 aircraft low and slow, just like the real thing, with accurate pitch authority and AOA. This led to a series of forum discussions between “Chunx” and “Hornit”, where one important result was that in-game settings for joystick sensitivities play a very big part in how the simulated Superhornet performs. “Hornit’s” conclusion was that the Jane’s F/A-18 flight model isn’t perfect, but for a computer entertainment product it does just fine, if you adjust your joystick sensitivities. Just as lessening the joystick response is critical to simulating A-10 performance, increasing the joystick response from its stock settings is critical to getting what most people feel is more realistic response for an F/A-18E. The “close enough” approach to this problem is simply to drag all of the Jane’s F/A-18 joystick sensitivity sliders to 100%. For a more refined approach, please see the Jane’s F/A-18 FAQ thread in the Jane’s F/A-18 Forum; in it there are documented settings for tested and realistic F/A-18E performance. The first is from “Hornit”, using a CH Flightstick, and the second is from “Julian Data”, using a Cougar. Remember that the same joystick sensitivities with different joysticks will result in different flight performance.

Wide-angle Cockpits

TSHv1 includes wide-angle cockpits for all three flyables. Unfortunately, HUD text overruns the combining glass frame in wideview mode, but just like the switchable cockpits, wideview can be toggled on-the-fly. Wideview can be very helpful in a turning fight, where an increased field of view outweighs the fact that it may become difficult to read all of the information on the MDIs (Multipurpose Display Indicators, the F/A-18’s version of MFDs).

normal wideview

High-resolution F/A-18E Cockpit

Stock cockpit textures in Jane’s F/A-18 are typically 256×256, resulting in blocky, pixilated cockpit text. A complete 1024×1024 texture replacement of all cockpit text takes a very functional cockpit and makes it look much nicer.

cockpit1_lo cockpit1_hi
cockpit2_lo cockpit2_hi
cockpit3_lo cockpit3_hi
cockpit4_lo cockpit4_hi
cockpit5_lo cockpit5_hi
cockpit6_lo cockpit6_hi
cockpit7_lo cockpit7_hi
cockpit8_lo cockpit8_hi

Go To Page 5


Aviation Indicator device ammeter A-2 VC-30B UI1 Vintage USSR set 3 picture

Aviation Indicator device ammeter A-2 VC-30B UI1 Vintage USSR set 3

$39.00



B&D Instrument Ammeter 660-8331-1 picture

B&D Instrument Ammeter 660-8331-1

$100.00



Edo-Aire Ammeter (0-400 amps) picture

Edo-Aire Ammeter (0-400 amps)

$34.99



BF Goodrich Prop De-Icer Ammeter 3E1886-4 picture

BF Goodrich Prop De-Icer Ammeter 3E1886-4

$75.00



Weston Aircraft ammeter -50 to 100 amp range Mod 606 RCAF for Landcaster? picture

Weston Aircraft ammeter -50 to 100 amp range Mod 606 RCAF for Landcaster?

$48.17



Aircraft Ammeter -30 To +30, Amp Gauge For Cessna picture

Aircraft Ammeter -30 To +30, Amp Gauge For Cessna

$40.00



Phaostron 621 Ammeter   0 to 30 Amperes D.C.    2

Phaostron 621 Ammeter 0 to 30 Amperes D.C. 2" NSN 6625-00-950-9848

$25.00



Vintage Scott Aviation Corp 0-30 Amperes 4015-5-11 Aircraft Ammeter picture

Vintage Scott Aviation Corp 0-30 Amperes 4015-5-11 Aircraft Ammeter

$30.00



VINTAGE NOS WWII MILITARY SIMPSON AMMETER AIRCRAFT AMP GAUGE & BOX  picture

VINTAGE NOS WWII MILITARY SIMPSON AMMETER AIRCRAFT AMP GAUGE & BOX

$85.00



Solartron 260848 Micro Ammeter NSN 6625-00-486-8272 picture

Solartron 260848 Micro Ammeter NSN 6625-00-486-8272

$287.32



Powered by WordPress. Designed by WooThemes